Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd Annual Conference and Expo on Biomaterials Madrid, Spain.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Raphael Gorodetsky

Hadassah Medical Center, Israel

Keynote: Fibrin interactions with matrix dependent cells: Applications and mechanism

Time : 10:00-10:35

Biomaterials 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Raphael Gorodetsky photo
Biography:

Raphael Gorodetsky is the Head of Laboratory of Biotechnology and Radiobiology at the Sharett Institute of Oncology, Hadassah Medical Center, affiliated to the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. He did his PhD at the Hebrew University in 1985 and Post-Doc at UCLA Medical Center. His earlier research interests were in developing new technologies for in-vivo analyses of trace elements. His interests include regenerative radiobiology and biomaterials for regenerative medicine with fibrin based biomaterials and interactions with different cell types. In applied research, he was the Founder and the Chief Scientist of Hapto Biotech, later merged to form Forticel International SA and was involved in numerous other ventures. Recently, he developed placental stromal cells based therapy for modulating regenerative processes and mitigation of radiation effects. Besides his numerous publications, he co-edited the book “Stem Cells Tissue Repair” (RSC publishers, Cambridge, UK). He is the Secretary of Israel Stem Cells Society (2014-2017) and is Member in different international societies.

Abstract:

Based on the haptotactic (cell binding) properties of fibrin, we have conducted extensive studies on the cell binding properties of fibrinogen and developed new Fibrin-based dense dehyrothermally crosslinked biodegradable Microbeads (FMB) for culturing high density of cells in suspension for their implantation. The FMB can attract and carry high number of matrix dependent cells of different types and can be used to culture stromal cells of different origin including fibroblasts, placental cells, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, chondrocytes and osteoblasts as well as endothelial cells. We employed FMB to isolate mesenchymal pluripotent stem cells from bone marrow and cord blood to expand them in vitro, and to induce differentiation in vitro or to implant as progenitors cells to produce cartilage and bone tissues. In parallel studies on the mechanism of cell binding to fibrin we identified new family of ~20mer epitopes on fibrinogen that seem to be responsible for the selective haptotactic activity of fibrin based matrices. Synthetic peptides of these sequences on a matrix could be used to augment cell binding to matrices in tissue engineering. The family of the short haptotactic peptidic sequences, which were termed haptides were also investigated as potent cell penetrating agents following fibrinolysis, as well as non-immunogenic synthetic cell penetrating sequences. The possible systemic adverse effects of penetrating peptides as well as fibrin derived haptides were also investigated in parallel.

  • Track 2: Polymer Biomaterials
    Track 3: Dental Biomaterials
    Track 4: Properties of Biomaterials
Speaker

Chair

Delair Thierry

University of Lyon, France

Speaker

Co-Chair

Jose Ramon Sarasua

University of the Basque Country, Spain

Session Introduction

Thierry Delair

University of Lyon, France

Title: Polyelectrolyte nano-complexes-Safe and Efficient tools for the delivery of drugs or vaccine

Time : 10:35-11:00

Speaker
Biography:

Thierry Delair received his PhD in Organic Chemistry in 1986 and Post-doctorate at the Stanford Research Institute (California). He has been Professor at University Lyon 1, since November 2008. Previously, he spent 20 years in R&D Department at BioMérieux, a medical diagnostics company. He developed polymeric materials for in vitro diagnostic applications and for vaccine delivery. He has published 135 articles in international peer-reviewed journals (h-index 33), filed 18 patents, and has given 60 oral presentations. His research results encouraged him to establish three companies: Ademtech (magnetic particles), CYTOSIAL BIOmedic (cosmetics SME) and Anabior (vaccines adjuvants).

Abstract:

The complexation of polyelectrolytes is very attractive to process polysaccharides into biomaterials, because it is energy efficient, requires no toxic chemical, has a low environmental impact and can be applied to biocompatible polymers such as polysaccharides.We used chitosan, a copolymer of N-acetyl glucosamine and glucosamine obtained from the partial deacetylation of chitin as polycation and a variety of polyanions such as dextran sulphate, hyaluronan, heparin, and chondroitin sulphate. These polysaccharides are generally regarded as safe and some of them can be found in the extracellular matrix of mammals. In this contribution we will present
our latest achievement in the control of the elaboration, structure and performances of polyelectrolyte nanocomplexes as drug and vaccine carriers of high potential. In particular, we will address the issues of colloidal stability in physiological media, a major limiting factor in the development of this technology; the nanocomplex loading with drugs or vaccine; the targeting of these nanodelivery systems. The formation of polyelectrolyte complexes is spontaneous at room temperature, i.e. under kinetics control. We will present an alternative approach close to the thermodynamic equilibrium and discuss the potentiality of this particularly innovative synthesis route. Finally, we will present our latest results on the delivery of anti-retroviral drug and the inhibition of the infection by the HIV-1 virus of hPBMCs in vitro.

Break: Networking & Refreshment: 11:00-11:15@Zamora
Speaker
Biography:

Jose R Sarasua is Professor of Materials Science at the Department of Mining-Metallurgy Engineering and Materials Science, Faculty of Engineering of Bilbao, the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU). He is the Principal Investigator of the ZIBIO group on Science and Engineering of Polymeric Biomaterials and Member of POLYMAT, the Basque Center for Macromolecular Design and Engineering. His research interests are focused on the synthesis, structure and properties of polymeric biomaterials for medical applications.

Abstract:

Today’s medicine requires bio-absorbable polymeric biomaterials that present thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) behavior, for their application as medical devices or scaffolds for soft tissue engineering. Among the most investigated polymers used as biomaterials, poly (glycolic acid) (PGA) and poly (lactic acid) (PLA) can be mentioned. These polyesters are however glassy at body temperature and mechanically brittle, so copolymerization with other monomers is a strategy to obtain TPEs with tuned biodegradation rate and mechanical properties. In a search of new polymeric biomaterials with TPE behavior, various lactones and macro lactones, most of them were employed previously by the chemical industry and cosmetics, which draw our attention. Among the cyclic esters, the following ones can be mentioned: β-propiolactone (β-PL), γ-butyrolactone (γ-BL), γ-valerolactone (γ-VL), δ-valerolactone (δ- VL), δ-methyl-ε-caprolactone, decalactones such as γ-decalactone (γ-DL), δ-decalactone (δ-DL) or ε-decalactone (ε-DL) (with rings of 5, 6 or 7 members respectively), ω-pentadecalactone (PDL), hexadecalactone or ethylene brassylate. Moreover, p-dioxanone or trimethylene carbonate may also be of interest. The mentioned substances are monomers that can be synthesized by ring opening polymerization on their own or on the dimmer (lactide and glycolide). In this work TPE copolymers of either high glass transition temperature (Tg) (>20ºC ) or low Tg (between -65 and 0ºC) are synthesized and characterized in terms of molecular parameters, physical, chemical and mechanical properties and biodegradation. In the former case, copolymers of lactide with other co-monomers are proposed in order to reduce the melt temperature and crystallization capability of polylactide. In the latter, alternative copolymers will be introduced for poly (ε-caprolactone). This is because polymers of high Tg present low ductility, brittleness and too high stiffness for soft tissue applications. Those of low Tg, however, though excellent in the combination of mechanical properties for soft tissue engineering and devices, present often too low biodegradation rates.

Ruchi Singla

Chandigarh Engineering College, India

Title: A Novel design of low cost Mastitis level measurement based on electrical resistivity

Time : 11:40-12:05

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Ruchi Singla is working as Professor and Head of Department in Chandigarh Engineering college, Mohali , India. She has 15 years of work experience and has done PhD in Wireless Communication from Thapar University, Patiala in 2013. She has to her credit around 30 research papers in journals of good repute and filed three patents. Her areas of interest are Antennas and Biosensors.

Abstract:

Mastitis is the major primeval disease of dairy cattle and it leads to inflammation of mammary gland and udder tissue. It is also considered as one of the costliest diseases of dairy animals. Pathogen invades the mammary glands usually caused by bacterial infection of udder tissues. It causes significant harm to the cattleman thereby decreasing the milk production and its quality, which is usually determined by the measurement of somatic cell counts per milliliter of milk. According to the Punjab Dairy Development Board (PDDB), Punjab, India, the average daily milk production in the state is 26.5 million liters a day. Sub clinical mastitis level usually varies from 10% to 50% in cows and 5% to 20% in buffaloes in Punjab region. To minimize the huge economic loss and to provide the cost effective solution for early/preliminary detection of mastitis, the presented work shows an exhaustive survey on cows and buffaloes of Bathlana, Badmajra and Mansa region of Punjab for early detection of mastitis along with a novel design of low cost mastitis detector based on electrical resistivity measurement technique. The presented results show that Buffalo immune system is stronger as compared to cow, due to anatomical structure of mammary glands.

Speaker
Biography:

Saurabh Gupta holds Master’s Degree in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery and has been in surgical practice since 2014. He is also trained in multiple allied surgical disciplines including Implantology and Laser Dentistry. He is involved in cosmetic dentistry including Smile Design (Certified in ClearPath, Botox & fillers). He has published his papers in various national and international journal publications and magazines like “Dentistry Today (US)”, “Access (US)”, etc. He is an editorial board member for many national and international journals (OMICS, Openventio Publishers, Scientia Ricerca, MedCrave, Symbiosis Online Publishing, Bio-Accent, Mathews Open Access Journals, SciFed Dental & Oral Research Journal, etc.). He is also working as a Medical Academic Writer & Research Scientist since 2010 at one of the renowned freelancing sites www.freelancer.com. His research interests are: Dental Implants, Laser Dentistry, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, and Dental Pain.

Abstract:

The key aim of this study is to present a comprehensive review of literatures on dental implant materials. The study focuses on titanium implants in a conventional manner and the newly introduced and highly popular zirconia implants. Some of the major areas covered under this study are clinical considerations and material science which includes implant materials as well as the impacts of its physical properties on outcomes of the treatment. Titanium is the gold standard for oral implants fabrication in spite of the sensitivity and despite having unclear clinical relevance. The zirconia implants are highly promising but further clinical studies are required. Also, there is a need of further technical experience and considerations for zirconia implants to lower the mechanical failure incidence.

Speaker
Biography:

Nour El Houda Kharbech is Young Researcher at the Faculty of Dental Medicine of Monastir in Tunisia. She is a Member of the Tunisian Association of Dental Researches and the Tunisian Red Crescent. She received a Doctoral degree in Dental Medicine from Dental Medicine Faculty in Monastir, Tunisia, recently. Her current field placement is with the Department of Biomaterial in Dental Medicine Faculty at the University of Monastir. She is interested in introduction of nanofillers in the dental field, behavior of PMMA resin under oral conditions, in vitro simulation of oral conditions and removable dental restorations’ problems caused by the material of fabrication.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Despite ceaseless evolutions in the dental practice, PMMA resin has managed to keep a prime position in the panoply of dental materials. Yet, this material is far from being perfect. Concerns are constantly reiterated throughout literature about its lack of mechanical resistance which results in frequent fracture and fatigue failures of dentures. This fracture creates inconvenience to both the patient and the dentist thus it could be considered as a failure of the executed treatment, in addition to further frequently unnoticed consequences regarding the incurred costs to the community of the dentures’ repair. Despite the wide range of solutions suggested to repair the damaged denture and to avoid its further fracture, a consensus seems not to be established yet. Recently, the use of microwave irradiation and nanofillers including silica nanoparticles with PMMA denture-resin has attracted researchers’ attention thus it showed encouraging results in different studies but their efficiency for repairs need to be further investigated.
 
Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: An in vitro study was carried out to investigate the flexural strength, fracture toughness and dimensional stability of 120 repaired PMMA samples after aging in artificial saliva. Autopolymerizing resin was used to repair them following four methods. For the first group, autopolymerizing resin was used alone. In the second, samples were post-treated with microwave irradiations. In the third, the autopolymerizing resin was filled with 2% nanosilica. For the fourth group, the second and the third approaches were combined.
 
Findings: The investigated mechanical properties showed higher mean-values when silica nanoparticles and/or microwave irradiation were used compared to the repair with autopolymerizing resin alone. The dimensional variation rates were under 0.03% for all the groups.
 
Conclusion & Significance: The combination of autopolymerizing resin filled with 2% silica nanoparticles and post polymerization treatment with microwave irradiation showed the highest mechanical properties without affecting the dimensional stability of the repaired samples.

Break: Lunch Break:12:55-13:55@Zamora
Poster Presentations:14:00-15:00@Avila